Category Archives: health

Wise Breakfast Choices

We are constantly being told that breakfast is THE most important meal of the day. You cannot start your day without any fuel — eating breakfast improves your concentration, alertness and overall performance and keeps you going through the day.

However, all of the above apply only if you have a healthy breakfast that does not overload your system with excess carbohydrates or even the bad kinds of fat.

Making the right choices of food for breakfast is as important as the meal itself! If you start your day on a high-carbohydrate, high-fat meal you are going to end up feeling sluggish and lethargic in the morning itself.

What’s more, if the pattern of your breakfast is constantly that of high calorie foods, in the long run it is going to expand your waistline, show up a few more kilos on the weighing scale and negatively affect your lipid profile.

So in the following pages, we’re going to give you the lowdown on the worst, fair and best breakfast choices.

Puri Bhaji
Serving: 1 plate (4 puris)
Calories: 450
Fat: 20 gms

Medhu Vada
Serving: 2
Calories: 260
Fat: 15 gms

Batata Vada
Serving: 2
Calories: 320
Fat: 15 gms

Aloo Paratha
Serving: 2
Calories: 580
Fat: 21.5 gms

Potato Toast
Serving: 1
Calories: 368
Fat: 22.9 gms

It doesn’t take a genius to figure out why the above rank as the five worst choices.

All are high on fat and very low on nutrition, ie they contain a lot of empty calories. These options are also very high on salt and low on fibre. Unfortunately, a lot of offices usually serve vadas and samosas as part of the mid-morning snack and most people end up having them as a second breakfast, so imagine the calorie overload early in the morning! Whether you are watching your weight or not, the above are options that should be in the category of ‘To be eaten once in a blue moon’!

Veg Upma
Serving: 1 mk
Calories: 180
Fat: 5.5 gms

Potato Poha
Serving: 1 mk
Calories: 185
Fat: 5.4 gms

Idli Sambar
Serving: 2
Calories: 312
Fat: 11 gms

Dhokla
Serving: 5
Calories: 110
Fat: 2.5 gms

Onion Pudla (salty)
Serving: 2
Calories: 350
Fat: 11 gms

As a nutritionist, I am asked nearly everyday — ‘Why can’t I include Upma or Poha or any of the above for breakfast?’

While all the above options are not fried and therefore not very high fat choices, they contain a lot of processed/refined carbohydrates and as a result, are low on fibre. Such foods affect and raise your blood glucose levels very quickly and also cause it to drop equally quickly, resulting in low energy and hunger pangs within an hour of eating. Whenever there are high levels of blood glucose in the bloodstream after a meal, some of this excess sugar may be burnt off if you are an active person — but most of it is converted to fat and stored in the body, causing weight gain!

Oatmeal Porridge
Serving: 30 gms
Calories: 250
Fat: 2 gms

Milk with Bran Flakes
Serving: 30 gms
Calories: 250
Fat: 2 gms

Egg-white Omelette with 2 slices of bread
Serving: 2 whites
Calories: 180
Fat: 5 gms

Daliya (salty) with veggies
Serving: 1 mk
Calories: 150
Fat: 5 gms

Brown bread sandwich with veggies
Serving: 2 slices
Calories: 250
Fat: 5 gms

Oats contain soluble fibre; this fibre is broken down slowly by the body, as a result of which energy is released into the blood stream gradually, keeping you going for the next two-three hours. The porridge can be made more nutrient-rich by adding two walnuts for omega 3 fatty acids & a few (three to four) raisins to add to the taste.

Milk with bran flakes is another ready-to-eat breakfast for people on the go, who don’t have much time to cook. You get good quality protein from milk and you get fibre from the cereal which keeps you full, along with several other nutrients which the cereal is fortified with. Add a fruit to this mix and you have a perfect start to the day!

Egg whites can be had boiled, scrambled or as an omelette. If you are watching your weight or your cholesterol, it is best to do away with the yolks and add veggies. However, if you are fit, exercise regularly and keep your meals low-fat, it’s okay to add one egg yolk twice weekly for Vitamin B 12. Eggs are a good source of high-quality protein and have a good satiety value. You can have high fibre or multigrain bread to go with it and can even add a fruit later to improve the overall nutrient value.

If you prefer an Indian-style option, daliya with added veggies is a good choice. Wheat cracks or daliya are nothing but broken wheat and contain a high amount of fibre. While it is not a source of high-quality protein, it helps keep you full for a longer time. If you want to improve its nutrient content, add a cup of milk with sugar and eat it as porridge.

Brown bread/multigrain sandwiches are also a good choice for people who have no time to cook. This high fibre sandwich can be further fortified by adding two or three teaspoons of cottage cheese or just one slice of low-fat cheese. Make sure you add a lot of vegetables — put in more of coriander chutney and less than a teaspoon of butter if you are watching your weight. Having a glass of milk with the sandwich will make it a more wholesome meal.

Vaishali Parekh

www.indian-cooking.info

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Take Care, Honey

They say, you are what you eat. But do we know what we are eating? Do we know who is cooking and who is serving us the food we take into our kitchens and then into our bodies?

The more I dig into this issue, it is clear that our world of food is spinning in directions that we know nothing about. This is not the way it should be.

Take honey. A sweet preserve that we take for granted comes from the bees that collect it from the nectar of flowers. We pick up the bottle from our local shop, believing that the honey has been collected naturally, it is fresh and certainly without any contaminants.

In most cases, we would even think that small farmers produced it or it was collected from the wild and packaged by large companies. In any event, we believe it is the honey that nature produced, collected and delivered to us, as nature would have wanted.

But little do we know
how the business of honey has changed. Nobody explains that the culture of food is intrinsically linked to biodiversity, of plants and animals.

But mess with biodiversity and you mess with food. The ubiquitous bee is one such instance. Some years ago, leading scientific institutions sold the idea of introduction of the European bee (Apis mellifera) into India, as it was a more prolific producer of honey.

This economically viable bee took over the business, virtually replacing the humble but more adapted Indian bee (Apis cerana) from our food. At the same time, the business of honey was also transformed.

It moved away from the small producers collecting honey from the wild and cultivating honey in natural conditions. It got consolidated into a highly organised business, controlled by a handful of companies.

Now it is these companies that handle all aspects of the trade – from the supply of the queen bee to the paraphernalia of bee-housing, feeding and disease-control to the producers, spread across different states.

It is an outsourced business
, run by franchisees whose job is to find places, like the apple farms of Himachal, where there is nectar for bees to suck.

We have lost the biodiversity of the bee and we have lost the diversity of the business. Business is not about food. It is about commerce.

But nature has its way of getting back at us.
The European bee is now showing signs of over-use across the world.

In the US and in Europe, there is worrying news about honeybee colony collapses – where bees are disappearing from colonies, not to return. This is hitting crop production as bees play a critical role in pollinating food crops across the US – a service, which is officially billed at some $20 billion annually.

The trade in pollinator bees involves carting bee colonies across the county, where crops need their service. But now there is evidence that this overwork, combined with the use of nasty new pesticides, new diseases and immune-suppressed bees, is destroying bees.

In India, we are no different. The dependence on one introduced species and emphasis on over-production mean bees are overworked in this competitive business.

As disease grows, the answer is to feed bees antibiotics liberally, mixed in sugar and other syrups. The bee makes honey and with it comes the lethal dose of unwanted antibiotics in our food.

When the Pollution Monitoring Laboratory of the Centre for Science and Environment (CSE) checked honey, it found a cocktail of antibiotics – mostly banned and severely prohibited to be in our food.

It found everything from the commonly used Ampicilin, Enrofloxacin, Ciprofloxacin, Erythromycin to the strictly banned Chloramphenicol in the honey made and packaged by the biggest and the most known. These antibiotics in food are bad for us, as any doctor will tell you, because they add to the bugs getting resistant to antibiotics.

The fact is that CSE’s laboratory checked two foreign brands bought from our local store. We know that there is strict control in these countries against antibiotics. In fact, Europe has kicked hell and banned Indian honey for having these antibiotics.

They do this because they say they care about their health.

Good. But the question is what about our health? Who cares about
this? Both brands that were checked had the same and even higher levels of antibiotics in them. The fact is that why should they care, when our government does not? The same government, which makes strict standards for the exported honey, could not care about what we are using domestically. There are no standards for antibiotics in Indian honey.

There is certainly no check on what ends up on our tables and in
our bodies.

But do not be surprised. This is the age of takeover by the big and the powerful only because we have compromised and have complicit food regulators. The recently set up Food Safety and Standards Authority has been dead on entry.

Do not be surprised. But be angry. This is not a takeover we
should allow.

It is about us. Our bodies. Our self.

Your comment is very much awaited.


Vaishali Parekh

www.indian-cooking.info

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Manage your depression… naturally

Being able to manage stress efficiently is among the best life-skills you can possess. If you possess effective stress management skills, you’ll enjoy a better quality of life and keep yourself healthy, even if it’s knowing how to cope with financial stress or having to handle the loss of loved ones, a marital split, relocation and stress with your job.
It can take a while to acquire the skills for dealing with stress efficiently but here comes three simple, highly-effective stress management tips that will enable you to reduce stress and anxiety quickly.

1. Keep An Eye On The Plates – When you’re in the middle of coping with a stressful event, it is crucial to not add to the stress and take on more pressure. Adding to an already full plate will merely increase the pressure and stress levels will soar making it much more difficult to remain in control of events. Think of it like spinning plates. As more and more plates are added, it becomes harder to keep each one spinning enough and plates start to fall to the ground and smash!

Give your attention to that which has to be done and resist the urge to add to the pressure. Imperative: Only decide to proceed with any life-changing decisions when you have stress or anxiety or depression thoroughly in check.

2. Indecision – Indecision is, without doubt, a contributor to stress and depression. It is an issue because hesitating about a decision draws out uncertainty. Dealing with uncertainty is very difficult if you are highly stressed, anxious or in a depressive episode. So, not only is it important to make a decision, it’s also crucial that once you have made a decision, you go through with it. What techniques are useful to help with decision making? Copy each alternative onto a sheet of paper divided into 2 columns, one for the plus points, one for the minuses.

Share responsibilities and obtain different points of view by consulting with family or good friends. Don’t rush, take your time, as much as you need to ensure you have all the facts. Once you feel ready, make your choice and follow it through. No looking back, just focus on making your decision work. Bear in mind that if you always looked behind you when you’re walking, you’d crash into things. Look forwards, not backwards and use this stress management technique with the next tip.

3. CrossOver Time – The one constant throughout life is change and as situations change – for example, relationship breakdown or losing a loved one – stress can be triggered and it is possible to enter into anxiety or depression. Expecting to adapt to your new circumstances right from the off is at the root of this because it puts a great strain on you. At such times, you can feel awkward and unsettled, and you can even start to feel like things have changed for the worse.

Allowing yourself plenty of crossover time is an excellent stress management technique to help you handle major changes to your circumstances. You’ll reduce stress significantly if you recognize that adapting to new situations can take a while and allocate enough crossover time so you keep stress and its related illness at bay.

Put each one of these effective stress management tips into action and they will help you to effectively handle the stress triggered by a change to your circumstances.

To discover more powerful, highly-effective stress management tips, techniques and methods to help you relieve stress, anxiety and depression quickly, naturally and permanently.

Click Here Now

Vaishali Parekh

www.indian-cooking.info

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An Uncommon But Serious Ailment

What Is Gluten?

The only treatment

The only treatment

Gluten is the common term for a group of proteins found in wheat, rye, barley, and grains derived from them or having different names like triticale, durum, kamut, semolina, and spelt. Grains are so common in our diet that gluten is second only to sugar as our most commonly consumed ingredient.

What Is Celiac Disease?

The digestive system is the set of organs that digest food and absorb the important nutrients the body needs to stay healthy and grow. One important part of the digestive system is the small intestine, which is lined with millions of microscopic, finger-like projections called villi. Nutrients are absorbed into the body through the villi.

People who have celiac disease have a disorder that makes their bodies react to gluten. When they eat gluten, an immune system reaction to the protein gradually damages the villi in the small intestine. When the villi are damaged, the body is unable to absorb the vitamins, minerals, and other nutrients it needs to stay healthy. People with celiac disease are therefore at risk of malnutrition and can develop anemia or osteoporosis.

The body’s inability to absorb nutrients can also mean that young people with untreated celiac disease may not grow properly and may have weight loss and fatigue. In addition, people who have celiac disease may be prone to developing other diseases, such as thyroid disease, type 1 diabetes, and gastrointestinal cancer.

What Causes It?

Experts don’t know exactly why people get celiac disease, which is also called gluten intolerance, celiac sprue, nontropical sprue, or gluten-sensitive enteropathy.

The disease has some genetic background, which means that it may run in families. Just like eye or hair color, people inherit the genes that make them more likely to get celiac disease from their parents and grandparents. If an immediate family member (such as a parent or a sibling) has celiac disease, there’s about a 5% to 10% chance that you could have it, too. Celiac disease affects people of all heritages and backgrounds.

It is estimated that 1 in 133 people in the United States has the condition, although many don’t know that they do.

Signs and Symptoms

It’s important to diagnose celiac disease early before it causes damage to the intestine. But because it’s easy to confuse the symptoms with other intestinal disorders, such as irritable bowel syndrome or lactose intolerance, teens with celiac disease may not know they have it.

Some common symptoms of celiac disease are diarrhea, abdominal pain and bloating, and weight loss. Someone with the disease may feel tired and could be irritable or depressed. Some have skin rashes and mouth sores. Teens with undiagnosed celiac disease may go through puberty late.

Someone might not show any symptoms until going through an emotionally or physically stressful event, such as going away to college, illness, or an injury or pregnancy.

How Is It Treated?

Once celiac disease is diagnosed, a doctor will help treat it. Although there is no cure, celiac disease can be managed successfully by following a gluten-free diet. People with celiac disease need to follow this diet for life. Because gluten can be found in everything from breakfast cereals to prepared luncheon meals, they need to be very aware of what’s in the foods they eat.

If you’ve been diagnosed with celiac disease, a doctor or dietitian who specializes in celiac disease can help you develop an eating plan that works with your lifestyle.

Luckily, the small intestine can heal. Although this process may take up to a year, many people start to feel better after just a few days on a gluten-free diet. But feeling better doesn’t mean that people with celiac disease can resume eating foods containing gluten. Because the genes that cause the disease are present in the body and the immune system continues to react to gluten, the symptoms and problems will return if someone with celiac disease starts eating gluten again.

Taking Care of Yourself

The good news about celiac disease is that most of the delicious and yummy foods, including birthday cake and pizza, can be prepared without gluten. So if you have celiac disease, you can still find ways to enjoy most of your favorite foods — you just need to do some research and be aware of what’s in the foods you eat.

Here are four things you should do if you have celiac disease:

  1. Learn to read labels to find out if a food contains gluten.
  2. Learn which foods are gluten free.
  3. Find alternatives to wheat, barley, and rye flours and other gluten-containing grain ingredients for your recipes.
  4. Find a support group where you and other people with the condition can share up-to-date information.

While the law requires the labeling of wheat-free products, be aware that “wheat free” doesn’t necessarily mean “gluten free,” as wheat-free products may have barley and rye (gluten-containing grains) in them.

Finding Gluten-Free Foods and Ingredients

Most grocery stores carry few gluten-free products these days. You may be able to find gluten-free bread, cereal, baking mixes, cookies, and crackers at your local market. For a wider selection, make a trip to a health food store. Be aware that lots of natural markets and health-food stores keep foods in bulk bins. It’s not a good idea to use even gluten-free products from these bins because the risk of cross contamination is very high.

Many specialty shops online also sell a range of gluten-free products, such as bread, pizza crusts, and pastas. Many regular and online shops even sell gluten-free flour blends that you can use to make your own pancakes and waffles, pizza dough, cookies, and brownies.

Eating a gluten-free diet is a lifelong commitment. But if you have celiac disease, you are not alone. Lots of support groups, cookbooks, and websites are dedicated to living a gluten-free life. To make sure you always have the most current and accurate information, consider joining one of the national celiac organizations. There are even gluten-free summer camps and special support groups just for kids and teens.

Grab the e-book where every recipe is completely gluten-free, sugar-free (except fruit), digestion-friendly, allergy-friendly and low glycemic with meat, poultry, fish meals and tree-nut-free, dairy-free, vegan and vegetarian options for most recipes.

Click Here for eBook
Vaishali Parekh

www.indian-cooking.info

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The Magic of Wonder Foods

Food for Thought

Food for Thought

Watching Angelina Jolie down a tall glass of strawberry milk, Jessica Alba relish a piece of sinful dark chocolate and closer home, size zero Kareena Kapoor lick her fingers after finishing her eighth meal of the day makes you wonder, where does the food go? Are they all blessed with a high metabolic rate? Do they invest millions in body shapers? Are they bulimic? Or do they live on their treadmills? The reality bite? They eat and they eat right.

  • Blueberries: Not only are they a rich source of antioxidants but also reduce ageing and help in keeping off abdominal fat.
  • Asparagus: Being a natural diuretic, it helps to shed water weight. Asparagus also contains phytochemical glutathione, which has antioxidants and cancer preventing properties.
  • Apples: Rich in fibre, they keep you satisfied for longer, which is the key to maintaining a healthy weight.
  • Eggs: High in proteins, eggs are good for long lustrous hair. Being a good source of Vitamin B12, they help break down fat too.
  • Yoghurt: A rich source of good bacteria, it strengthens and stabilises the immune system. These probiotics can also work in our bodies to benefit our complexions, leaving the skin softer, smoother and less prone to breakouts.
  • Green tea: Aids digestion, detoxifies the body, making the skin glow. It also helps burn calories.
  • Salmon: A rich source of Omega 3 fatty acids that help burn fat and add glow to the skin. Salmon contains astaxanthin, a carotenoid that improves skin elasticity, so you’ll have fewer fine lines.
  • Cabbage: Contains cancer fighting goodness like chemical sulforaphane and phytonutrients which act to prevent damage to cell membranes from free radicals and is excellent for detoxification.
  • Dried plums: Great for digestive health, they also keep the heart healthy, reducing cholesterol levels. Plums contain potassium, magnesium and boron which regulate blood sugar levels and reduce wrinkles.
  • Beets: The natural yellow or betacyanin and the purple or betaxanthin of the beets are pigments that are potent phyto-chemicals and antioxidants fantastic for protecting from the damage that free radicals can cause to the body.
  • Pomegranate juice: Loaded with antioxidants, it is also said to destroy breast cancer cells, halt the development of lung cancer and lower the risk of blood pressure.
  • Papaya: Beneficial for skincare and repair, it can be used to eliminate old dead skin cells, dandruff and other skin disorders and even reduce signs of premature ageing.
  • Cinnamon: Reduces cholesterol levels in the body and regulates blood sugar, making it extremely beneficial for those with type 2 diabetes.
  • Sardines: Contain Omega 3 fatty acids that aid brain function and calcium and Vitamin D for strong bones.
  • Pumpkin seeds: Said to be the most nutritious part of the pumpkin, they contain high levels of magnesium which is good for general well being. They also contain L- tryptophan, a compound that acts naturally against depression.
  • Turmeric: Helps in digestion and contains anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties. It also acts as a great antioxidant.
  • Almonds: High in alpha linoleic acid, they can speed up the metabolism of fat as they contain good fat. Almonds are an excellent source of the skin loving antioxidant Vitamin E, providing 35 per cent of the required daily value.
  • Soyabeans: Contains choline which breaks down fatty deposits and blocks fat absorption.
  • Milk: Being rich in potassium, vitamins, calcium and protein, milk helps make the bones stronger. It’s external application leads to healthy skin and shiny hair.
  • Dark chocolate: Full of antioxidants, it also reduces signs of premature ageing and is being used in skin treatments worldwide.
  • Strawberries: Used topically in traditional medicine to treat burns and other skin irritations due to their astringent and anti-inflammatory properties.
  • Chili: Capsaican, the chemical that makes chili so spicy, improves the body’s ability to clear insulin from the blood stream leading to increased fat burn after the meal.
  • Cherry: The iron content in cherry is 20 times higher than that in apples or oranges. It promotes the formation of haemoglobin.
  • Bean sprouts: Rich source of proteins, vitamins, minerals and fibres. They can prevent freckles and dark spots.
  • Avocados: A good source of biotin, avocados help to prevent dry skin and brittle hair and nails. When applied topically, they hydrate parched skin.
  • Tomatoes: Besides being a great source of the antioxidant lycopene, tomatoes are considered a highcarotenoid fruit. These nutrients may help slow down cellular damage from free radicals.
  • Walnuts: Walnuts are a rich source of Omega-3 fatty acids, which help put shine in your hair, aid in making skin smoother and younger.
  • Beans: Legumes help repair cells that have suffered free radical damage. During digestion, protein breaks down into amino acids, which help to speed the repair and regeneration of skin cells and collagen.
  • Mushrooms: Great for skin, they have anti-ageing properties and also boost hormone secretion in women.
  • Carrots: Rich source of Vitamin A, which is essential for good skin. They also improve eyesight.

P.S.:- While I was looking for info to write the above article I stumbled upon a great e-book where you would get to know everything that you ever wished to know about weight reducing diets. You shall come across a great deal of amazing facts which shall make you realize that it is not at all necessary to starve yourself to get that fabulous body. You just have to be aware of what to eat which shall make you lose a huge amount of weight beyond your wildest imagination.

Watch the video with patience, it is extremely informative. And then do not waste time to grab the e-book.

See the video

Vaishali Parekh

www.indian-cooking.info

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Deal with Cancer – Naturally

Beware

Beware

Drinking an average of five sodas a week doesn’t sound like much… but what would you say upon learning that they nearly double your risk of getting pancreatic cancer — one of the deadliest of all malignancies?

This shocking statistic about soda comes from a study at the University of Minnesota. Researchers analyzed medical records and diet histories of 60,524 Asian adults over a 14-year period (the records came from the Singapore Chinese Health Study, the Singapore Cancer Registry and the Singapore Registry of Births and Deaths), comparing consumption of soft drinks (in one group) and fruit juice (in another group) with the incidence of pancreatic cancer… and found that the incidence was 87% higher among those who drank soda.

The researchers established that this link was independent of other risk factors
– such as smoking, body weight, type 2 (adult-onset) diabetes, caloric intake and the consumption of red meat. Having established that lifestyles in Singapore are very similar to those in the US, lead study author Noel Mueller, MPH, research associate at the Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center at Georgetown University Medical Center in Washington, DC, assured me there’s nothing uniquely dangerous about soda in Singapore — it’s the same stuff people drink here. Acknowledging that there are some genetic differences between the populations, he told me that he doesn’t think that those are as significant as the fact that soda drinkers likely don’t have the same healthy habits as fruit juice drinkers.

Not So Sweet

Researchers hypothesize that sugar is the culprit, with 12.5 teaspoons of sugar (usually in the form of high-fructose corn syrup) in a 16-ounce, 200-calorie sugar-sweetened soda, on average — that’s enough to trigger the pancreas to produce a surge of insulin. Dr. Mueller theorizes that this habitual “blasting” of the pancreas with so much sugar may stimulate cancerous tumor growth over time. Though fruit juice is also high in sugar, researchers think that the nutrients and fiber in juices may buffer any unhealthy impact.

The resulting advice to limit sugar intake is predictable, of course — but I’m guessing that even those of us who already do that have vastly underestimated the potential damage that even a few sodas a week can do. This is no time for sweet talk: Stay away from sugary soda.

P.S. The term ‘cancer’ strikes the fear of death in most of us, in fact, cancer is synonymous with death. But do we know that there are a number of ways to prevent and even cure cancer? Are we aware? No, I am not talking about chemotherapy, which pushes you faster towards death, nor am I talking of surgery.

Alternative therapy is an extremely powerful form of treatment which can provide magical treatments. Follow the link below to get some life saving and valuable insight into the alternative form of cancer prevention and cure.

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Vaishali Parekh

www.indian-cooking.info

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Get rid of Bad Breath – Forever

Brushing in vain

Brushing in vain

Improve your Self Esteem- by getting rid of Bad Breath

Millions of people suffer embarrassment due to bad breath. The technical name for bad breath is “halitosis”. Take a walk down the personal care aisle of any drug or grocery Store and you will find product after product all dealing with this condition.Before we can discuss how to get rid of bad breath, we need to have an understanding of the causes and symptoms.

Interesting to note is the fact that dental hygiene was practiced as far back as ancient Greece and Rome. The Greeks used to chew on anise seeds. Anise tastes like licorice.

The Romans discovered that chewing on parsley would disguise the smell of alcohol on their breath.

They were probably unaware that parsley is high in chlorophyll which turns carbon dioxide into oxygen making it a natural as one of the first breath fresheners.

Everyone has an occasional problem with bad breath which is why Americans spend more than $200 million a year on products to freshen the breath.

Pills, mouthwash, breath mints, toothpaste and more comprise this industry.

Bad breath that is persistent, consistent and resistant to normal remedies can be symptomatic of a more serious condition.

Bad breath can be caused by the following:

  • Poor dental hygiene — Infrequent or improper brushing and flossing, allows bits of food that are stuck between the teeth to decay inside the mouth. Poor oral hygiene eventually will lead to periodontal (gum) disease, which also can cause bad breath.
  • Infections in the mouth — These can be caused by either a cavity in a tooth or by periodontal (gum) disease.
  • Respiratory tract infections — Throat, sinus or lung infections
  • External source — Garlic, onions, coffee, cigarette smoking, chewing tobacco. Smoking and drinking coffee, tea and/or red wine will contribute to your teeth becoming discolored.
  • Dry mouth (xerostomia) — This can be caused by salivary gland problems, medicines or “mouth breathing.” A large number of prescriptions and over the counter medicines cause dry mouth.
  • Illnesses — Diabetes, liver disease, kidney disease, lung disease, sinus disease, reflux disease and others
  • Psychiatric illness — Some people may believe they have bad breath, but others do not notice it. This is referred to as “pseudohalitosis.

Symptoms

You may not always know that you have bad breath. That’s because odor-detecting cells in the nose eventually get used to the smell. Other people may notice and react by stepping away from you as you speak, or making a face.

Other symptoms depend on the underlying cause of bad breath:

  • Infections in the mouth — Symptoms depend on the type of infection. They can include:
    o Red or swollen gums that may bleed easily, especially after brushing or flossing
    o Pus between teeth or a pocket of pus (abscess) at the base of a tooth
    o Loose teeth or a change in how a denture fits
    o Painful, open sores on the tongue or gums
  • Respiratory tract infections — Symptoms may include:
    o Sore throat
    o Swollen lymph nodes (“swollen glands”) in the neck
    o Fever
    o Stuffy nose
    o A greenish or yellowish discharge from the nose
    o A cough that produces mucus
  • Dry mouth — Symptoms may include:
    o Difficulty swallowing dry foods
    o Difficulty speaking for a long time because of mouth dryness
    o Burning in the mouth
    o An unusually high number of cavities
    o Dry eyes (in Sjögren’s syndrome)
  • Illnesses — Symptoms of diabetes, lung disease, kidney failure or liver disease

You are reading this right now because you or a loved one suffers from the disease of bad breath… halitosis! And one word you can use to describe the disease which affects 50-80 million Americans is… Embarrassment!

In fact, in many cases, people voice how ‘bad breath’ has created social and psychological barriers and has even affected personal relationships with their significant other. Constant worry about the smell of halitosis can even have a negative effect how people perform professionally. At work, dates, parties, gatherings, and daily life, bad breath can be devastating to anyone.

So do you have bad breath? Simply worrying about your bad breath or keeping your fears to yourself is not a good solution. Ask honest opinions about your breath from trusted family and friends may be the first step to a ‘call to action’ against bad breath.

To learn what halitosis is and five natural remedies to treat halitosis, please keep reading.

Go through this great research report on Bad Breath and its natural remedies


Vaishali Parekh

www.indian-cooking.info

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